Bunya nuts are large, smooth seeds found inside football-sized pine cones that grow on the evergreen coniferous Bunya pine, which is native to subtropical parts of Queensland and northern NSW. The trees can grow up to 35-45 metres high and can live for more than 600 years. Harvesting of the bunya trees occurs from January to March.

Dating back to the days of the dinosaurs, bunya nuts are large, smooth seeds found within the fibrous kernel of football-sized pine cones that fall from the evergreen coniferous Bunya pine.

Bunya nuts weigh up to 10 kilograms.

As well as being a staple food for Indigenous Australians for thousands of years, harvesting the bunya trees was associated with ceremonial gatherings and festivals; tribes from across the country would travel to share in the festivities.

Traditionally, bunya pine seeds were roasted on an open fire and eaten, like a very large nut.

Download The Australian Superfood Co provenance map here.

Image source: image one, image two, image three.
  • The nutritional content of the bunya nut is similar to that of a chestnut.
  • The bunya nut is made up of water (40%), complex carbohydrates (40%), protein (9%), fat (2%) and minerals, including potassium and magnesium.
  • Bunya nuts have a low Glycaemic Index (GI) rating.
  • Bunya nuts are gluten free, making them an ideal substitute for flour in its ground form.
  • The bunya nut provides a valuable source of protein.
  • Bunya nuts exhibit antibacterial properties that can be of use as an antibiotic or antimicrobial, making them an ideal ingredient in skincare products.

Flavour:

A mild, slightly sweet, nutty flavour similar to almond meal, dry floury potato or roasted chestnuts.

Palate:

Whole the texture is crunchy and creamy similar to a chestnut, but when dried and ground the flavour becomes more earthy with pine wood like notes on the back palate.

Aroma:

Earthy, sweet, nutty aroma, similar to an almond or macadamia, with pine and freshly milled spelt and buckwheat notes.

With a low glycaemic index, containing protein, potassium and magnesium, and being gluten free, ground bunya nuts are an ideal substitute for flour. The uses are endless; the whole nut can be roasted, used in place of almonds or macadamia nuts, while the ground nut can replace flour in cakes, biscuits, breads or pancakes.

Click here for delicious Bunya Nut Meal recipe ideas.

Provenance

Bunya nuts are large, smooth seeds found inside football-sized pine cones that grow on the evergreen coniferous Bunya pine, which is native to subtropical parts of Queensland and northern NSW. The trees can grow up to 35-45 metres high and can live for more than 600 years. Harvesting of the bunya trees occurs from January to March.

Dating back to the days of the dinosaurs, bunya nuts are large, smooth seeds found within the fibrous kernel of football-sized pine cones that fall from the evergreen coniferous Bunya pine.

Bunya nuts weigh up to 10 kilograms.

As well as being a staple food for Indigenous Australians for thousands of years, harvesting the bunya trees was associated with ceremonial gatherings and festivals; tribes from across the country would travel to share in the festivities.

Traditionally, bunya pine seeds were roasted on an open fire and eaten, like a very large nut.

Download The Australian Superfood Co provenance map here.

Image source: image one, image two, image three.
Health Benefits
  • The nutritional content of the bunya nut is similar to that of a chestnut.
  • The bunya nut is made up of water (40%), complex carbohydrates (40%), protein (9%), fat (2%) and minerals, including potassium and magnesium.
  • Bunya nuts have a low Glycaemic Index (GI) rating.
  • Bunya nuts are gluten free, making them an ideal substitute for flour in its ground form.
  • The bunya nut provides a valuable source of protein.
  • Bunya nuts exhibit antibacterial properties that can be of use as an antibiotic or antimicrobial, making them an ideal ingredient in skincare products.
Taste & Smell

Flavour:

A mild, slightly sweet, nutty flavour similar to almond meal, dry floury potato or roasted chestnuts.

Palate:

Whole the texture is crunchy and creamy similar to a chestnut, but when dried and ground the flavour becomes more earthy with pine wood like notes on the back palate.

Aroma:

Earthy, sweet, nutty aroma, similar to an almond or macadamia, with pine and freshly milled spelt and buckwheat notes.

Food Uses

With a low glycaemic index, containing protein, potassium and magnesium, and being gluten free, ground bunya nuts are an ideal substitute for flour. The uses are endless; the whole nut can be roasted, used in place of almonds or macadamia nuts, while the ground nut can replace flour in cakes, biscuits, breads or pancakes.

Click here for delicious Bunya Nut Meal recipe ideas.